Military police officers of the infantry, Landgrafschaft Hessen-Kassel, 1776-1783
Military police officers of the infantry, Landgrafschaft Hessen-Kassel, 1776-1783 At exactly the same time Georg Christian Carl Henschel settled in Kassel to cast bells and cannons, Landgrave Friedrich von Hessen-Kassel signed a contract. For the American Revolutionary War he leased 19,000 soldiers to Great Britain. With the income generated by this soldier trade, the Landgrave financed the establishment of a blooming cultural landscape in Kassel, including not only the construction of the Fridericianum in 1779 and Schloss Wilhelmshöhe in 1786, but also the the present-day art collection of Museumslandschaft Kassel. The purpose during recruitment was to enlist as many transient out-of-towners as possible. Riches, gold, and land were promised, but many were attracted to the job by the daily provisions alone. Many were volunteers, although abductions and even drafts did occur. Recruiting officers traveled all over Hesse to remind the sons of farmers and simple craftsmen that they were subject to compulsory military service. In “Intrigue and Love" Friedrich Schiller thematizes this soldier trade at the beginning of the second act. (Illustration: Charles M. Lefferts; Public Domain)
This image is from the Rheinmetall Defense website. It shows the infantryman of the future, able to move more efficiently and better protected.
This image is from the Rheinmetall Defense website. It shows the infantryman of the future, able to move more efficiently and better protected. (Illustration: Rheinmetall Defense)
Hessian Banner March (1732) by Landgrave Ludwig VIII